SCCS Colloquium

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Due to regulations regarding the COVID-19 situation, all the SCCS Colloquium sessions are cacelled at least until April 19. If you need to present your work as part of a graded project, please contact your advisor. We are currently looking into online alternatives.

The SC²S Colloquium is a forum giving students, guests, and members of the chair the opportunity to present their research insights, results, and challenges.

Do you need ideas for your thesis topic? Do you want to meet your potential supervisor? Do you want to discuss your research with a diverse group of researchers, rehearse your conference talk, or simply cheer for your colleagues? This is the right place for you!

When and where: Thursdays at 3 pm, in the room 00.08.053. Guests are always welcome!

You don't want to miss a talk? Subscribe to our mailing list and our Colloquium calendar (iCal link, updated regularly).


Schedule

October

Colloquium slots: October 2, 7, 9, 17, 24, 31

Wednesday, October 2

Deniz Candas: Auto-Tuning via Machine Learning in AutoPas
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. Deniz is advised by Steffen Seckler and Fabio Gratl.

15:00-16:00
MI 02.07.023
Details

Martin Bogusz: Exploring Modern Runtime Systems for the SWE-Framework
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. Martin is advised by Alexander Pöppl and Philipp Samfass.

Wednesday, October 9

Fritz Hofmeier: Applying the Spatially Adaptive Combination Technique to Uncertainty Quantification
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. Fritz is advised by Michael Obersteiner.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Henri Rößler: Simulation of diffraction effects of sound waves
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. Henri is advised by Carsten Uphoff.

Thursday, October 17

Manuel Dell'Antonio: Definition and Evaluation of a Flight Control System for Future VTOL Applications
Master's thesis submission talk. Manuel is advised by Julian Rhein (TUM FSD) and Prof. Hans-Joachim Bungartz.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Nicol Fottner: Developing and Benchmarking a Molecular Dynamics Simulation using AutoPas
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. Nicol is advised by Fabio Gratl.

Thursday, October 24

Ayman Noureldin: A Master-Slave Approach for Multi-Phase Fluid-Fluid Coupling of OpenFOAM and ATHLET
Master's thesis submission talk. Ayman is advised by Gerasimos Chourdakis, in collaboration with GRS.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Kilian Glas: Exploitation of component grid symmetries for sparse grid density estimation with the combination method
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. Kilian is advised by Kilian Röhner.

Thursday, October 31

Moritz Spielvogel: Active Learning using Uncertainty Quantification
Master's thesis introduction talk. Moritz is advised by Ionut Farcas, in collaboration with PreciBake.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Dmitrij Boschko: Generalization and Parallelization of Sherman- Morrison System Matrix Updates for Sparse Grid Density Estimation
IDP submission talk. Dmitrij is advised by Kilian Röhner.

Johannes Stubenrauch: Boosting the Runtime Performance of a FEM Solver for Turbine Simulation
Master's thesis introduction talk. Johannes is advised by Hayden Liu Weng and Prof. Michael Bader.

November

Colloquium slots: November 7, 14, 21, 28

Thursday, November 7

Ludwig Gärtner: Performance Analysis and Code Generation for the Force Calculation in Molecular Dynamics Simulations
Guided research submission talk. Ludwig is advised by Fabio Gratl.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Peter Wauligmann: Linear Equation Solvers on GPUs for FEM in Structural Mechanics
Master's thesis introduction talk. Peter is advised by Hayden Liu Weng, in collaboration with MTU AeroEngines.

Looking for a third, short talk - register here

Thursday, November 14

Pei-Hsuan Huang: A GPU accelerated Lattice Boltzmann Solver
Master's thesis submission talk. This is an external thesis at Lilium, examined by Prof. Hans-Joachim Bungartz.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Looking for a second talk - register here

Thursday, November 21

Vincent Bennet Bautista Anguiano: Integration and Visualization of Sparse-Grid based Clustering Methods in the SG++ DataMining Pipeline
Master's thesis introduction talk. Vincent is advised by Paul Sarbu and Kilian Röhner.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

There is still room for talks - register here

Thursday, November 28

Sebastian Walter: Deep Learning for Parameter Reduction on Real-World Topography Data
Master's thesis introduction talk. Sebastian is advised by Anne Reinarz and Lukas Krenz.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Bruno Miguel: A Distributed Actor Library for HPC Applications
Master's thesis submission talk. Bruno is advised by Alexander Pöppl.

December

Colloquium slots: December 5, 12, 19

Thursday, December 5

Julian Suk: Second-Order Optimisation for the Training of Deep Neural Networks
Master's thesis introduction talk. Julian is advised by Severin Reiz.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Niklas Stotzem: Normalization of Datasets for Sparse Grids Datadriven Methods in the SG++ Datamining Pipeline
MSE Research Internship talk. Niklas is advised by Kilian Röhner.

Thursday, December 12

Looking for a first talk - register here

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Looking for a second talk - register here

Thursday, December 19

Tobias Humig: Shared-Memory Parallelizations for Verlet-Lists in AutoPas
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. Tobias is advised by Fabio Gratl.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Looking for a second talk - register here

January

Colloquium slots: January 9, 16, 23, 30

Thursday, January 9

[CANCELED] Nikolaos Ioannis Bountos: Subpixel Classification of Anthropogenic Features Using Deep Learning on Sentinel-2 Data
Master's thesis submission talk. Nikoalos is advised by Prof. Thomas Huckle.

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Looking for a second talk - register here

Thursday, January 16

Looking for a first talk - register here

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Looking for a second talk - register here

Thursday, January 23

Looking for a first talk - register here

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Looking for a second talk - register here

Thursday, January 30

Looking for a first talk - register here

15:00-16:00
MI 00.08.053
Details

Looking for a second talk - register here

February

Colloquium slots: Feburary 5, 12, 19, 26
The lecture period is over, we change back to Wednesdays. The room also changes to MI 01.09.014.

Wednesday, February 5

Sven Hingst: Shared-Memory Parallelization of a Parallel Combination Technique Framework
Bachelor's thesis submission talk, in German. Sven is advised by Michael Obersteiner.

15:00-16:00
MI 01.09.014
Details

Nikolaos Ioannis Bountos: Subpixel Classification of Anthropogenic Features Using Deep Learning on Sentinel-2 Data
Master's thesis submission talk. Nikolaos is advised by Prof. Thomas Huckle.

Wednesday, February 12

Michael Zintl: Design and Implementation of a Modular Primary Flight Display for a Flight Simulator
Master's thesis introduction talk. This is an external thesis at the TUM Institute of Flight System Dynamics,
advised by Pranav Nagarajan and Julian Rhein and examined by Prof. Hans-Joachim Bungartz.

15:00-16:00
MI 01.09.014
Details

Looking for a second talk - register here

Wednesday, February 19

Qunsheng Huang: Loose Coupling of Isolated Rotorblade Rotorcraft CFD/CSD Simulations using preCICE
Master's thesis submission talk. Qunsheng is advised by Gerasimos Chourdakis, in collaboration with
Amine Abdelmoula from the Institute of Helicopter Technology.

15:00-16:00
MI 01.09.014
Details

Jan Nguyen: AutoTuning using Bayesian Statistics in AutoPas
IDP submission talk. Jan is advised by Fabio Gratl.

Wednesday, February 26

Joachim Marin: Implementation of the Fast-Multipole-Method Using AutoPas
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. Joachim is advised by Steffen Seckler and Fabio Gratl.

15:00-16:00
MI 01.09.014
Details

Rafael Hefele: Dimension Adaptive Efficient Global Optimization for Expensive Blackbox Problems
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. This is an external thesis at the TUM Department of Civil, Geo and Environmental Engineering,
advised by Koushyar Komeilizadeh and Prof. Fabian Duddeck and examined by Prof. Hans-Joachim Bungartz.

March

Colloquium slots: March 4, 18, 25

Wednesday, March 4

Moritz Spielvogel: Active Learning on Classification Tasks
Master's thesis submission talk. Moritz is advised by Ionut Farcas, in collaboration with precibake.

15:00-16:00
MI 01.09.014
Details

Eric Fuchs: Comparison of distance metrics for MDS based NLDR using CNNs
Bachelor's thesis submission talk, in German. Eric is advised by Severin Reiz.

Wednesday, March 18 [ONLINE]

Anna Mittermair: Efficient Time Integration of ODEs Using Different Parallel Architectures, Programming Models and Integration Methods [POSTPONED]
IDP submission talk. Anna is advised by Martin Schreiber.

15:00-16:00
Online
Details

Jakob Englhauser: Application and Evaluation of Auto-Tuning Tools in Molecular Dynamics Simulations
Bachelor's thesis submission talk. Jakob is advised by Fabio Gratl.

Wednesday, March 25 [ONLINE]

Anna Mittermair: Efficient Time Integration of ODEs Using Different Parallel Architectures, Programming Models and Integration Methods
IDP submission talk. Anna is advised by Martin Schreiber.

15:00-16:00
Online
Details

Looking for a second talk - register here

Note: More slots are already available in the registration form. As we are currently migrating to a new website, new slots will appear here only if needed.

Due to regulations regarding the COVID-19 situation, all the SCCS Colloquium sessions are cacelled at least until April 19. If you need to present your work as part of a graded project, please contact your advisor. We are currently looking into online alternatives.

Past Colloquia

Colloquia from Winter Term 2018/19 to Winter 2007/08 can be found here.

Very old colloquium announcements can be found here.

Information for speakers

Registration

To register and schedule a talk, you should fill the form Colloquium Registration at least two weeks before the earliest desired date. Keep in mind that we only have limited slots, so please plan your presentation early. In special cases contact colloquium@mailsccs.in.tum.de.

  • Students doing their Master's thesis at our chair are expected to give two talks:
    • The first talk presents the topic, the status quo, and the research plan. This should be placed early (first month of the work), such that colleagues can comment and give adequate feedback. It also helps students to structure their coming work. (10 minutes + 5 minutes discussion)
    • The second talk presents the thesis' results and insights. (20 minutes + 5 to 10 minutes discussions)
  • Students doing their Bachelor's thesis, IDP, Guided Research, Semesterarbeit etc. at the chair are supposed to give one talk. This presents the thesis' results and insights. (20 minutes + 5 to 10 minutes discussions)
  • Doctoral candidates and guest researchers are always very welcome to give a talk to our colloquium as well. We recommend the 20min talk + 5-10min discussion format, but we can also host longer talks.

Room and equipment

Depending on the period, the SCCS Colloquium takes place in the room 02.07.023, or in the room 00.08.053. In case you want to rehearse your presentation, you can freely enter when the room is available. In special cases, we may use a different room.

Both rooms are equiped with a projector EPSON EB-4650, which offers XGA resolution (1024x768, 4:3, laptop can connect at 1920x1080).

We recommend that you use your own laptop (please bring your own adapters). We can also provide a laptop which runs Linux (i.e. no Microsoft Office). Please export your slides in PDF format beforehand (a USB drive will be available). Please contact us in case you need this option

We can also provide you with a presenter/laser pointer (Logitech R400, USB) and whiteboard markers.

Room 02.07.023

Seminar room MI 02.07.023
  • Capacity: 34 seats (5 rows)
  • Projector connections: HDMI only
  • Writing surface: two sliding whiteboards
  • Availability: TUMonline calendar

Room 00.08.053

Seminar room MI 00.08.053
  • Capacity: 20 seats (3-5 rows, depending on the setup)
  • Projector connections: HDMI, VGA
  • Writing surface: two sliding whiteboards (conflicting with projection area), side whiteboard.
  • Availability: TUMonline calendar

What to expect

During the colloquium, things usually go as follows:

  • 10-15min before the colloquium starts, the speakers setup their laptops or transfer the presentations to the moderator's laptop. The moderator currently is Gerasimos Chourdakis.
  • The colloquium starts with an introduction to the agenda and the moderator asks the speaker's advisor/host to put the talk into context.
  • Your talk starts. The scheduled time for your talk is normally 20min with additional 5-10min for discussion. Introduction talks are allocated 10min.
  • The moderator keeps track of the time and will stand up at the end of your time, after which point you should try to wrap up the most important remaining points. Auxiliary to that, there may be a 20min visual timer that shows the remaining time and beeps shortly (and quietly) at the end. You can also tell the moderator if you prefer to keep track of time for yourself. The moderator will pause the time tracking if any discussion pops up.
  • During the discussion session, the audience can ask questions, which are meant for clarification or for putting the talk into context.
  • Congratulations! Your talk is over and it's now time to celebrate! Have you already tried the parabolic slides that bring you from the third floor to the Magistrale?

Preparing a great talk

Do you remember a talk that made you feel very happy for attending? Do you also remember a talk that confused you? What was different between the two?

Here are a few things to check if you want to improve your presentation:

  • What is the main idea that you want people to remember after your presentation? Do you make it crystal-clear? How quickly are you arriving to it?
  • Which aspects of your work can you cover in the time frame, with a reasonable pace and good depth?
  • What can you leave out (but maybe have as back-up slides) to not confuse or overwhelm the audience?
  • How are you investing the crucial first two minutes of your presentation?
  • How much content do you have on your slides? Is all of it important? Will the audience know which part of a slide to look at? Will somebody from the last row be able to read the content? Will somebody with limited experience in your field have time to understand what is going on?
  • Are the figures clear? Are you explaining the axes or any other features clearly?
  • Which questions would you like the audience to ask you? How can you trigger these?

In any case, make sure to start preparing your talk early enough so that you can potentially discuss it, rehearse it, and improve it.

Here are a few good videos to find out more:

Did you know that the TUM English Writing Center can also help you with writing good slides?